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Posts tagged "healthcare"
This is an imperfect law. But what’s most important is that it provides a structure under which the country can make a start not only on universal coverage — as an ethical imperative — but on doing away with the waste and inefficiencies created by the chronic market failure of the US health insurance system. Again, that matters. And I suspect that there’s no going back.
WELL SAID JOSH MARSHALL
This is not much of a surprise to me. I’m glad my faith in the judicial system wasn’t totally shattered today, and that shit was upheld so that one day I might be able to qualify for actual health insurance despite my pre-existing condition I was born with.

The Blaze screencapped as I know that’s my entire family’s #1 source of “news”.

This is not much of a surprise to me. I’m glad my faith in the judicial system wasn’t totally shattered today, and that shit was upheld so that one day I might be able to qualify for actual health insurance despite my pre-existing condition I was born with.

The Blaze screencapped as I know that’s my entire family’s #1 source of “news”.

YOU ALL HAVE MEDICAL INSURANCE, GIVE THIS FINAL PUSH EVERYTHING YOU’VE GOT!

6AM Spin. Substitute instructor. Super militant, heavy British accent, mediocre club music that was not correlated to the workout whatsoever [there is nothing like being at the top of a climb and being told to push as hard as you can for 40 seconds in the dead lull between the ending of one song and beginning of another]. Was not a fan. Got a super hard work out regardless.

Due to her britishness, a remix of Dizzee Rascal’s “Bonkers” showed up in the mix mid-class. It wasn’t a very good remix, but I typically jog and ride my bike trainer at home to a lot of Dizzee Rascal, so it was familiar feeling to me.

When someone is at the helm and barking orders at the class, and making you feel like it is not ok to back off, or sit out a round of interval standing sprints, or whatnot— this style of instruction does not work for me. My inner-child rebellion against parents who yelled at me a lot comes out, and I get all “fuck you!” back at that instructor.

The bit about medical insurance that was barked at us [see quote] threw me off a bit. This is the USA, after all. We’re notorious for NOT having health insurance. Given my congenital heart defect for which I have a pacemaker, I don’t qualify for any non-government insurance providers on my own without the help of an employer-sponsored plan— I’ve even been denied health insurance when working for huge corporations in the past that pay for 100% of employee health insurance premiums. After several months of no insurance, the company was able to get the decision reversed, but since I did not fit the model of their normal employee health-standards by definition of United Healthcare, I had to pay $4000 a year to cover my extra premium while most everyone else at the company had their premiums paid for completely. If Obama’s re-elected, his pre-existing condition clause goes into effect in 2014 which will help people like me DRASTICALLY. While I understand that this is a double edged sword and I truly believe there are definitely downsides to opening this can of worms, for people such as myself for whom the system is flat out completely unfair to, this plan is a godsend.

My whole not-being-able-to-qualify-for-insurance ordeal is quite ironic. I am one of the most proactively healthy people I know, and every cardiologist I’ve ever visited in my entire life is floored at how healthy and in-shape I am compared to most normal people, much less given the functional left ventricle I was born without. My condition requires the pacemaker to keep my heart stable and make up where my left ventricle lacks, but I’ve never had to take additional heart medications, something that is unheard of with this condition and my age. This is attributed to the fact that I take care of myself exceedingly well. I rarely get sick. I hate going to the doctor. The only thing I ever use my insurance for is general pacemaker checkups. And a replacement every 7 years or so.

I recently switched to state-government-sponsored insurance in order to take on a huge opportunity for career advancement (I’m fortunate enough to live in a place where this exists and is easily accessible). This was a massively risky decision for me, and along the way to making that decision, I applied at every large health care provider in this country for an individual plan. Mind you, they don’t give you any sort of physical examinations when evaluating whether or not you qualify for insurance. And none of them rejected me for having a congenital heart block. They rejected me only for having a *pacemaker*.  They rejected me for having a device that keeps me healthy, not for the reason (that still is alive and in full swing) for why I have a pacemaker in the first place. It made me wonder if I had never had the pacemaker implanted and ended up in a wheelchair for the rest of my drastically shortened life— would I qualify for a plan then? Or would I be rejected for needing to use a wheelchair? The general disheartening sentiment I felt from most of the rejection letters I received from insurance providers across the country seemed to be “we’re sorry you have a pacemeker, fuck off and die already!”


That sort of rage-reaction to spin instructor’s statement, despite her intention, helped me push through that final leg of torturous spin class. I don’t think I’ll be returning to her class.